Courses offered

School Was Never so Much Fun

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The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of nutrient digestion and metabolism across species. It is expected that by the end of the course students have a good understanding of the relationships among organs, tissues, cells, hormones, and enzymes with respect to the physiological processes of nutrient digestion, absorption, and metabolism. More specifically, students we aim for students to understand the chemical nature and functions of various nutrients (water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, and vitamins) and how they are digested and utilized in different animals, the mechanisms that control eating, digestion, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients and the factors that affect these processes, the current methods of measuring the chemical composition and biological value of feed ingredients, the quantitative approaches to calculate nutritional requirements, and to understand similarities and differences in the nutritional physiology of various species.

The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of nutrient digestion and metabolism across species. It is expected that by the end of the course students have a good understanding of the relationships among organs, tissues, cells, hormones, and enzymes with respect to the physiological processes of nutrient digestion, absorption, and metabolism. More specifically, students we aim for students to understand the chemical nature and functions of various nutrients (water, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, and vitamins) and how they are digested and utilized in different animals, the mechanisms that control eating, digestion, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients and the factors that affect these processes, the current methods of measuring the chemical composition and biological value of feed ingredients, the quantitative approaches to calculate nutritional requirements, and to understand similarities and differences in the nutritional physiology of various species.

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This course covers major principles involved in beef cattle production from the standpoint of U.S. cow-calf sector, including, but not limited to, U.S. and Nevada cattle industry, breeds of cattle mostly used in beef cattle operations within U.S, reproductive and health herd management decisions, nutritional and biology of growth, aspects of beef cattle production systems, beef cattle feeding systems, beef cattle cycle management (cow calf, backgrounding, finishing and marketing), contemporary and global issues associated with beef cattle industry, and special topics for Nevada cattle industry . Upon completion, students are expected to be able to define and classify most beef cattle production systems within the U.S., to be able to evaluate the dynamics of the beef cattle supply chain, to determine environmental and biological limitations within production systems as well as production cycle categories (cow calf, backgrounding, finishing), to be able to distinguish many interactions between different sectors of beef cattle industry, to be able to compare and hypothesize possible solutions to enhance problem solving within a beef cattle operation enterprise, and to be able to adapt and devise solutions pertinent to each beef cattle production scenario.

This course is taught as a comprehensive and advanced basis of experimental design for animal, agriculture, biological and veterinary sciences from an applied Mixed and Generalized Mixed Modeling perspective. The course will expose students to general principles of statistics, probability, variance, general experimentation and data collection. Upon completion, students are expected to be able to define and classify experimental designs, to be able to evaluate the coherence and cohesion within a research paper, to determine statistical limitations within research trials, to be able to distinguish many possible interactions that may jeopardize research results and/or level of statistical inference, to be able to compare and hypothesize a more suitable design for a research trial, and to be able to devise statistical solutions for upcoming research trials.

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